Snow in Chinatown (in February)

March 25, 2011 at 10:01 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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In February we got an impressive amount of snow in the span of about two hours. I went out with Nano and Pico for a little while to enjoy it, but unfortunately I couldn’t manage both of them and my camera. As a result, all my street photos were taken with my iPhone — and in low light, even — so they’re really not my best work. I think they’re neat, though, so I’ll include them anyway.

After I dropped the dogs back off at the apartment, I grabbed my real camera and went to the tea garden with my tripod to see if I could get some neat shots. I was pretty pleased with the results. =)

The city looks so surreal with the snow and the sodium lights

Our neighbor's apartment and the snow

The King Street gate in the snow (Is "gate" the right word? I don't know.)

Nano is camouflaged

A Chinatown dragon with King Street Station in the background

The tea garden in the snow

The tea garden with Blake's old building in the background

Our spiffy arch. It looks so cool in the snow! The girls in the distance are making a snowman.

Building a snowman (I don't know who this is.)

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Victoria is cold!

November 25, 2010 at 2:03 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment
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Victoria was absolutely freezing. The temperature hovered around 23 degrees, and the snow was falling in big, thick flakes. And the wind was gusting so hard that the snowflakes and the cold would creep into every nook and cranny and drafty spot in our coats. No big post today — Happy Thanksgiving! — but here are a couple photos so even those of you in Texas can feel like it’s winter somewhere. =)

The snow was so thick. You can hardly see the buildings one block away!

It looks like we're in Russia! The snow was blowing everywhere. (This is the House of Parliament in Victoria.)

“Hope you like rain!”: The climatological facts about Seattle

July 26, 2010 at 3:52 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments
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Do you know what is the appropriate thing to say when you find that someone is moving to Seattle? I’ll give you a hint — it’s not “Hope you like rain!” As it happens, I do love love love rainy days — but Seattle is not the rain capital of the world (or even the US) that everybody thinks it is. From Wikipedia:

At 37.1 inches (942 mm)[80], [Seattle] receives less precipitation than New York, Atlanta, Houston, and most cities of the Eastern Seaboard of the United States. Seattle was also not listed in a study that revealed the 10 rainiest cities in the continental United States.[81] … Thunderstorms occur only occasionally. Seattle reports thunder on just seven days per year … For comparison Fort Myers, Florida reports thunder on 93 days per year. Kansas City reports 52 ‘thunder days’ and New York City reports 25.

Don’t get me wrong — Seattle does have more rain than Austin. But as a rain-lover this is just fine with me. Whenever I see a glimmering 20% chance of showers on the weather forecast, I watch the radar all day in hopes that whatever little baby shower is floating around will float right over here to our house and then hang out for a while. (This happens wayyy less than 20% of the time. I think there must be some geographic/climatic condition that makes our particular spot receive unusually little rain.)

Another less popular but still frequent response we often get is, “Hope you like snow!” This is also not the right answer. Due to Seattle’s proximity to the ocean, the weather actually stays pretty temperate despite its northern latitude. In fact, Seattle gets an average of only 13 inches of snow per year. Compare this with Cleveland’s 56.9 inches, New York City’s 28.4, and Lubbock’s 10.2. In fact, Seattle gets the same amount of snow annually as Richmond, Virginia — not exactly the snow capital of the world. (You can check the annual snowfall for a bunch of US cities at the NOAA’s site here.)

If you compare Seattle to Austin, here’s what you get:

Two charts displaying weather statistics for Austin and SeattleYou can see that Seattle is only a little bit colder in the winter but way less hot in the summer (and there is way more rain). If you want to see these charts on Wikipedia, here are Seattle’s, Austin’s and a page explaining how to read this kind of chart. Although I’m sure I’ll be a bit colder in the winter, I’m generally pretty happy about the upcoming change in climate.

So! What is the correct response when someone says, “We’re moving to Seattle”? It’s “Congratulations!” :D

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